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What Shall I Do With That Old Mauser? Part 2

What Shall I Do With That Old Mauser? Part 2/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d6a7c89a_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d6a7c89a_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The tools the author used for barreling the .45.  A finishing chamber reamer, Go and No Go headspace gauges, floating reamer holder, the rifle’s bolt, Kuhnhausen shop manual on the Mauser rifles, the prepared, painted receiver, and the indispensable depth micrometer. With a little imagination and a lot of skill, you can create a .45 ACP Mauser rifle. It doesn't matter why. This project is just plain fun. Last issue we played around with modifying an old 8mm Mauser into a .45 ACP.  It was just one of the mostly meaningless jaunts into guncrafting goodness that turned out to be a fun, creative challenge.  I’ve already completed the magazine modifications and the construction of a new magazine well to make use of .45 ACP cartridges.  The remaining tasks to be done are to fit a barrel to the gun and figure out how to shorten the bolt throw, without of course, cutting out a chunk of receiver (and bolt) and welding it back together. Getting Started The first thing to do was the most difficult, or at least the most time-consuming chore. Initially I determined just how far I wanted the bolt to cycle, and where the ejector should be located.  The receiver had a “thumb hole” in the left side to accommodate thumb clearance when using a stripper clip to load the gun.  Basically it was a scoop out of the left side of the receiver just above the bolt rail way. Cutting a taper using the compound rest is pretty easy, as long as, like the author, you can temporarily control your caffeine shakes.  Using 180 sandpaper to smooth out the contour after the cutting is done blends it all together seamlessly. I decided to move the ejector up to just in front of this scoop and to make use of that scoop to place the new bolt stop.  In order to accomplish this job, I milled out from a piece of half-inch square steel bar stock a new ejector housing that spanned from the housing screw hole and arms on the left rear of the receiver (where the original ejector housing and bolt stop had been) all the way to an inch or so forward of the scoop.  I then had to make a slot just in front of the scoop so the ejector could project into the bolt way from the ejector housing. Forming the ejector housing was pretty easy, making measurements with a caliper of the bends, turns, and corners of the receiver, and then milling the block to fit.  The original hole where the bolt stop projected into the receiver and the original ejector slot were used as guides to align the new housing along the receiver.  A small flanged projection fitted in this area to align the housing.  In the “scoop” area I simply left a whole big block of material that pretty much made a false wall in the scoop.  I drilled and tapped a hole near the front of this blockish mass and inserted a quarter-inch long 4-40 socket head screw. Related GunDigest Articles 7mm Mauser: Still A Dandy Sporting Round Gun Review: The Mauser Brothers and the Model 98 Savage Arms B.MAG Bolt (17 WSM) Recall Notice Then I ground a slight bevel on the rear of the tightened screw.  When pushing the bolt forward, the left side bolt lug contacts that small bevel, pushing the housing out slightly and allowing the bolt to pass, while pulling the bolt back forces the lug to impact the unbeveled front of the screw, stopping it in its tracks.  To finish this piece off, I cut an angle on the outside front of the housing and then milled a few flutes into the top, bottom, and left sides of the housing.  I then painted the housing with the same black Aluma-hyde II that covered the receiver. How to Make it Go BIIING! Now that the bolt stop had been created, I now had to make the ejector work.  I wanted to keep the original ejector and not have to fashion a new one from scratch.  I milled into the front end of the housing a slot to fit the ejector and drilled a hole for a roll pin for the ejector to rotate upon.  Then I slowly modified the ejector to project out sufficiently to insert itself in front of the bolt when the bolt was fully open.  I made two small cuts in the outside of the ejector, creating a spring guide of sorts for a small spring (just happened to be the bolt stop detent spring from an AR-15). This spring pushes the ejector against the bolt, forcing the front of the ejector into the ejector slot on the left side of the bolt face as the bolt is pulled back, making contact with the left rear face of the cartridge case head.  Of course a relief hole was drilled in the ejector housing to accommodate the spring.  I effectively did all this by eye in little increments, and it was pretty time-consuming.  In the future, if I do this thing again, I will spec out some measurements based on this housing, but this time I was shooting as I went along.  Fortunately, the housing slot aligned perfectly with the slot cut into the receiver.  This is probably because I did precisely calculate that particular task, and it was rock steady because of the “guides” previously mentioned. See! I’m not a complete “wing it” gunsmith. Frustration and Correction The completed ejector block. I should also make note of the ejector housing ears on the left rear of the receiver.  I thinned them out by a few thousands by polishing to reduce the friction back there.  My first thought for a tension spring was to place a small loop spring in between the ears.  That didn’t work.  This tension is, of course, very important as it serves to keep the entire housing flush against the left side of the receiver, and it has to be stronger than the ejector spring that was pushing against the bolt.  This one really stymied me; I had no room or leverage to work with in the back, and there didn’t appear to be any other way to make this work. Then, with a 100-watt light bulb pulsing above my head, I cut off a piece of the original flat magazine spring, still slightly curved, and about one inch long.  I drilled a hole near one end and used the bolt stop screw to hold it in place on the inner false receiver wall of the ejector housing.  This spring extended back to make contact with the inside wall of the receiver, back where the original ejector entered the receiver.  It was thin enough to not interfere with the bolt, but had enough tension to just barely keep the ejector housing pressed tight to the receiver, and just enough give to allow the housing to be pulled out enough to allow the bolt lug to pass by the stop screw so that the bolt could be removed from the rifle.  This detracted a tiny bit from the clean lines of the gun, as when the bolt was pulled out there appears this ugly foreign-looking flat spring thing.  But it works and that was enough for me. Last But Not Least Barreling the gun was vanilla.  I first contoured the barrel down to about what the original barrel’s diameter measured, and made it 16 ¼ inches long.  It’s truly amazing how much lighter a barrel blank becomes after you cut a third off the end and turn it down a bit.  I wanted to make sure that the outside diameter and bore were concentric the whole way so I trued the muzzle end and reversed it, put that end in the lathe chuck and stabilized the barrel with a live center and steady rests on the other end before the final contouring cut. I can say with pretty certain authority that this barrel, unlike ANY you get on a factory gun, is truly concentric. The ejector block from the left side.  The author was quite proud of the way this assembly turned out, as it looks really darn cool. I put a taper in front of the chamber that roughly matched the factory barrel, though not exactly, as the original 8mm barrel was stepped.  On the muzzle I installed a completely unnecessary muzzle break.  I say unnecessary, as a .45 produces little gas to redirect, and the recoil from a .45 carbine is best described as a gentle push.  But it looked cool, so I did it anyway.  I also permanently attached this brake since there would be no reason to remove it in the future.  I threaded it on, timed it to align properly, drilled a hole through it, pinned it, and took it to my gunsmith buddy Mark to weld the pin in the hole (I didn’t have welding equipment readily available, and besides, he’s better at welding than yours truly). I was also able to cut a superb chamber with minimum headspace thanks to the virgin reamer I purchased from Dave Manson Precision Reamers.  New, quality reamers like this one cut as if the steel was actually butter, as long as you don’t reverse the cut and dull the tool.  Or allow the reamer to get clogged with chips.  Or not use sufficient cutting fluid.  Or feed the reamer too fast.  Or not use a floating reamer holder.

The 4 Best Scopes for 17 WSM – Winchester Super Magnum Optic Reviews 2020 Photo by ‘Scratch’ / CC BY Ahh, the mighty .17 "Winchester Super Magnum" . While most .17 caliber rimfire rounds were developed by simply necking down existing .22 rounds, the .17 WSM was made by necking down a powerful .27 caliber nail gun blank, which allows it to push a bullet at a whopping 3000 feet per second. Naturally this screamer of a cartridge requires care in selecting optics. You’ll be wanting a scope worthy of the great accuracy potential of this round, so higher magnification and centerfire quality are the order of business. No cheap simple rimfire scope will do, so we sat down with a pot of coffee and scoured the bowels of the internet in the interests of finding the 4 best scopes for .17 WSM out there. The coffee was good and so are these scopes! BSA 17 Super Mag Scope BSA Optics 17SM4514x44AORGBCP 17 Super Mag Rifle Scope, 4.5-14x44mm Price: $117.49 Price as of 08/13/2020 20:39 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. There aren’t many scopes custom built around the .17 WSM, but this is one of the best. BSA is well known for quality optics at affordable prices, and this is no exception. It features a ballistic ranging reticle calibrated for 20 and 25 grain bullets, adjustable objective, 4.5-14 power magnification, a huge 44mm objective lens, plus water, fog and shock proof construction. This is truly a .17 WSM scope for the ages, and packed full of high dollar features at a strangely reasonable price. If you are somewhat short on funds or don’t want spend too much of your hard-earned dough, this is the best scope for .17 WSM in my book. BSA 17 Super Mag Scope Watch this video on YouTube

Steyr Files Lawsuit Against SIG, Demands Injunction Against P320 for Patent Infringement

Steyr Files Lawsuit Against SIG, Demands Injunction Against P320 for Patent Infringement

SIG SAUER is riding high following the announcement that their P320 handgun has been accepted for service by the U.S. military to replace the aging Beretta M9. Naturally everyone else in the gun manufacturing world, especially those who were their competition during the selection process, are trying to throw spanners in the works and keep the guns from actually being delivered. Today’s complication comes from Steyr Arms, who claim that they have a patent on the removable chassis system that makes the P320 (and P250 ) series handguns unique. The complaint filed May 3rd in U.S. district court for the northern district of Alabama references Steyr’s patent US6260301 (filed in 1999 and approved in 2001), which is for a handgun with a removable chassis. Read more at thetruthaboutguns.com

Does everyone need a $500-$750 red dot sight?

Does everyone need a $500-$750 red dot sight?

A question has come to mind lately about the various product offerings out in the firearm world… particularly red dot sights. We are all on different budgets and have different shooting goals. My goal is to become a good mid range shooter. I purchased an ACOG. Finally. However this blog’s goal is to discuss the AR15 as a rifleman’s weapon. You don’t need an ACOG to be a rifleman, you need an understanding of your rifle, ammunition, and fundamentals of marksmanship. Tied into all that is your choice of sighting system. One trend that consumers have readily adopted are the assorted variables and red dot sights. Many companies offer these products in entry-level price points (a step above much of the cheaper chinese optical junk) and as a shooting community we have adopted them en mass. The large amount of competition in this market means there are products with very competitive price points. These products tend to be at the  $200-300 dollar sweet spot for new AR15 owners looking at their first upgrade. My First Accessory ® The low price and value standpoint really grab a new shooter’s attention. Depending on which forum you visit, you will see others encourage the “good enough” low price point stuff where in other forums you will get INTERNET YELLED AT to save your money for optic X, Y, or Z. Yes, ultimately you should buy quality… buy once cry once… but we all know that there are some things that are tough as hell yet don’t cost much to manufacture. Kalashnikov anyone? British Sten? 20 Dollar LED wristwatches that last for decades?! Ultimately there is a point where tech and design reach their peak. So I got to thinking about those red dots.  We have had LED’s for decades. Electronics in general are smaller and more durable. The generic red dot sight design has been perfected now for *many* years. The question is, have we crossed a technology threshold where the simple red dot can be designed with a minimum standard of quality and not-self destruct on top of our hard use AR15’s? The AK of Red Dots, Are You Out There? So for a new shooter, I want to recommend items that will help ease their transition from casual or hobby shooter to a more serious shooter. There are certainly red dots and variables that will carry a new shooter through this phase and still be reliable and durable as they start getting more serious about shooting. The key here is to navigate the crap entry level optics from the durable ones. Where is the AK of red dots? I am focusing this discussion on red dots because they are simple machines. Two adjustments (elevation, windage) and a mounting screw. Battery. Certainly some of these simple machines are durable enough to hold our confidence even if SHTF without spending $500 smackers on a T1? Maybe? I am embarking on a review series to test middle of the road red dot sights. I am looking for the “Everyman’s optic” if there ever were such a thing. If we are to be a nation of riflemen, we need to be able to encourage people to get gear that will suit their budget and skill level while having some cash left over for the important things… ammo and practice. That will ultimately make a shooter a rifleman faster than a fancy piece of gear. You brought your backup iron sights right? You know… Just in case.  🙂 Look for some reviews soon. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Where is David Earl Burgert?

Time has passed, news organizations and police have moved on; but one question remains.  Where is David Earl Burgert?  A fugitive militia member and survivalist who fired on police during a routine traffic stop remains at large and no one seems to know how to find him. "David Earl Burgert" ’s criminal record dates back to 2002 when he was convicted on federal weapons violations after an investigation into the Project 7 militia, which he was associated with in Montana.  The former Marine has been described as a bully, confrontational neighbor, and a troublemaker by local law enforcement and people who know him.  He has also been diagnosed with paranoid personality disorder. What is interesting about David Burgert’s story is not that he is common criminal with mental problems, but the fact that he has survived in some of the harshest country on this earth for almost a year without support, or so it seems. Quick Navigation Rookies vs Pros So where is David Burgert now? Rambo or Bozo Rookies vs Pros Around the same time David Burgert had his run in with local law enforcement, another group of criminals also started a crime wave in Florida.  In the summer of 2011 three siblings know as the “Dougherty Gang” also started their trouble with law enforcement with a minor traffic violation that turned into a high-speed chase with them evading police by shooting out the pursuing police car’s tires.  The Dougherty Gang went on to rob a bank a few hours later in Valdosta, GA and then led police on a nationwide manhunt.  Before their high speed chase, the Dougherty Gang had 20 felonies between the three of them (Ryan 21 years old, Dylan 26 years old, and Lee Grace 29 years old).  Not exactly a model family. "The Dougherty Gang" lasted just 8 days before law enforcement in Colorado caught up with them after a customer in an REI parking lot identified them.  The trio had stopped by REI to pick up a tent to avoid staying in hotels while they made their way across country.  It is probably obvious to most observers that the Dougherty Gang, comprised of a stripper (Lee Grace), a pedophile (Ryan), and a pot head (Dylan), were way out of their league trying to avoid detection and live off the land while on the run.  Although we don’t know their level of survival training or preparedness, we can only assume they that would not be able to hold a candle to David Earl Burgert who walked into the woods never to be seen again. It is interesting to look at these two somewhat similar cases and see how knowledge and preparedness can make a big difference in the outcome.  While we are not glorifying the criminal David Burgert, we do find it interesting that he has survived for almost a year while the Dougherty Gang lasted only 8 days. So where is David Burgert now? This is where we get into a little team SurvivalCache speculation and we invite you to speculate in the comments below as well.  After his disappearance police speculated that David Burgert planned this event and had made a series of survival caches and possibly stashed an SUV or other type vehicle in the woods.  It was believed that he was planning this event because law enforcement found a large stash of weapons, ammo, and survival gear in his jeep after the chase.  Also, the week before the shoot out, Burgert had a similar traffic violation and made comments to the officer that the next time it would take a SWAT team to take him down. An episode of America’s Most Wanted put Burgert in Montana, Colorado, or Idaho.  Most likely we feel he is still in Montana getting support from former Project 7 militia members or friends and family.  Although we do not know why or how law enforcement came up with the theory about a stashed ATV or SUV, we would put that theory as doubtful.  The idea that David Burgert planned that far ahead and had an SUV secretly stashed in the forest near where he disappeared is remote at best.  A lot of things would have to happen just the right way for a police chase to end near the area where you stashed an SUV on public land.  Possible, yes, likely, no.  Stashing something above ground on public land goes against almost every principal of survival caching that we know of.  More than likely David Burgert spent 1 to 2 weeks in the woods with only the gear he had on his body when he disappeared into the forest.  He most likely waited out the dragnet by finding dense brush to hide in or simply hiked out of the search zone.  The police did not say it but we will say it for them, finding a person who doesn’t want to be found in the Rocky Mountains is like finding a needle in a haystack.  As for gear, all we know for sure is that he had a pistol on him because he fired at law enforcement as he fled into the woods.  The police reported a large amount of ammo and gear found in his jeep at the time of his escape.  This is another telltale sign that things did not go as planned for David Burgert.  We don’t know many survivalists who have a Plan A where they leave behind good survival gear and ammo.  Most likely Burgert was executing Plan B or even Plan C when he jumped out of his jeep. Burgert’s trouble started when someone reported him driving erratically in his Jeep near a rest stop by Lolo, Montana.  Police soon caught up with him and the chase ensued.  Our thoughts are this: if you are a convicted felon with a car full of guns and ammo, not to mention a former militia member with anti-government behavior, why would you want to bring attention to yourself and get the government really after you?  Doesn’t make a lot of sense to us either.  We think he was drunk or stoned, got into a police chase and jumped out of his jeep, leaving all of his preps behind.   Again, this is our theory; but we feel it makes more sense than leading police on a chase to a hidden batmobile in the mountains. Is Burgert dead?   While this is always a possibility, we feel that this is unlikely for a few reasons.  First it was early summer in Montana and although the mountains are unforgiving and the nights can be cold, a survivalist dying from exposure in those conditions is unlikely.  Second, even a lightly trained boy scout could figure out ways to find food and water in order to survive for a week in the mountains of Montana in the summer.  A seasoned survivalist and Marine such as Burgert would have few problems here.  Now if he stayed in the mountains through the winter then the chances of him dying would increase drastically. Rambo or Bozo Burgert surviving off the land?  We feel that this is also very unlikely.  From what we have read, Burgert is an anti-government militia man, not a mountain man.   We feel there is a big difference.  Even with survival caches in place, it is likely that Burgert is getting support from someone he is close to.  Also, based on what we have read, he is not exactly a folk hero among the locals so support would have to come from someone that he is fairly close to such as a family member, girlfriend, or militia member.  Anyone else who met up with Burgert would turn him into the police.  In 2002 he went to jail based on an informant who infiltrated the Project 7 Militia.  Based on this, we think he would most likely only trust a family member or girlfriend. If we were trying to catch him, we would pinpoint all of the areas his friends and family live in, focusing on anyone that lived on the edge of the city or in the mountains.  From there, we would sweep a two-mile zone around those homes focusing on areas near running water.  Although he could be living in someone’s basement, we feel it is more likely that he is visiting a home at night to get resupplied.  Getting caught living at someone’s house means that person is going to spend a long time in federal prison for aiding and abetting a known fugitive.  Of course it is possible, but you would really have to like David Earl Burgert a lot to take that risk and we’re guessing not many people do. What do you think?  Is David Earl Burgert alive or dead?  Where do you think he is hiding and how would you catch him?  It might take a survivalist to catch a survivalist. Photos by: Associated Press TrapZero Other interesting articles: Survival Cache Podcast Episode 10: The AR-15 Part I Active Shooter!!! Use Sunglasses to Maintain a Tactical Advantage Survival Debate: Solo or Group

The F-Class Rifle for Competition

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d580fd20_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d580fd20_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } The author’s latest F-TR rifle on its first outing for load development. Notice the one-piece cleaning rod and the bore guide. The syringe near the ammo box is used to apply a special grease at various points on the bolt. It takes a special rifle to be competitive in a 1,000 yard shoot. The F-Class rifle is up to the job. Let’s say you’ve decided you want to shoot F-TR [F-Class Target Rifle – Editor], because you have a nice, heavy-barreled .223 or .308 rifle that shoots lights out, sub-MOA, all day long, as long as you do your part. You have a Harris bipod, and the rifle is topped by a 12X scope. I think that is an excellent idea, but probably for different reasons than you would expect. The way I see it, you aren’t going to waste any money up front. Instead, you will show up at a competition and experience first-hand what it’s like. The good thing about using old Thor’s Hammer, or Daisy or whatever you call your rifle, is that you will observe a few things that will help you in your quest and not make you spend tons of money just to get to the first match. There will be plenty to learn and lots of time to upgrade your equipment, if you decide you want to continue. Among the first observations you will make is that the targets are small and far away, so more scope magnification would be nice, and the reticle should not wipe out the 10- and X-rings. Also, the 15- or 20-round matches heat up the barrel, and you may experience point-of-impact shift, which can be disconcerting during a string. If you’re shooting LR [Long Range – Editor], you may be wondering if that miss was due to ammo, marksmanship, or conditions. It could be all three. The author’s first F-TR rifle, an Armalite M15T with a 26-inch Krieger barrel, Magpul PRS stock, and Weaver T-36 scope on the Sinclair Gen2 bipod. That is a Bob Sled under the rifle, the best device for single load of an AR with 100-percent bolt open. There’s nothing worse than trying to cycle the action in prone position during a match. I am currently on my third F-TR rifle, and while the first two where production rifles I’d had re-barreled with long, top of the line, heavy barrels, my most recent one was built to my exact specifications for long-range competition. My first rifle was an AR-15, to which I fitted a 26-inch Krieger Varmatch barrel with a .920-inch overall diameter (OD). I still use this rifle for MR [Mid-Range – Editor] competitions, using 80-grain bullets, and I have attained High Master at that distance with it. It is amazingly precise and just a joy to shoot. At long range, however, the 80-grain bullets are toys for the conditions. If the wind was calm they’re fine, but calm days are rare at long range. My second rifle was an old Ruger M77, to which I had fitted a phenomenal 32-inch Broughton 7.9-contour barrel. I also changed the stock to a Boyd’s and the trigger to a Timney, so the only Ruger component left is the action. That rifle did very well for me, and I still keep it as my backup in big matches. Related GunDigest Articles First Look: FN 15 Competition Rifle First Look: Ithaca Precision Rifle Gallery: 10 Most Influential Rifle Designs My current rifle is made up of premium components that were assembled by a competition gunsmith. The action is a Stolle Panda F-class, right-hand, right-bolt, micro-port and no ejector from Kelbly’s. The trigger is a Jewell, the one-ounce version with no safety and no bolt release. The stock is the laminate F-TR model from Precision Rifle and Tool, with the three-way adjustable buttplate and the Anschütz rail underneath the fore-end. The author and his rifle with the NRA Whittington Center’s George Tubb range as backdrop. Scope rings are from Kelbly’s and are mounted on the integrated 20 MOA rib on the receiver. The scope is a Nightforce NXS 12-42X56mm with 1/8 MOA adjustments and an NP-2DD reticle. The barrel is a Krieger 32-inch 1:11 twist stainless steel barrel with a medium-heavy Palma contour. Designing an F-TR rifle is a budget game; you always want the heaviest, longest barrel you can get, but you are limited by the weight restrictions of the F-class game. The last thing you want is to show up at a big match and find out your rifle is over the 18.18-pound limit. Once you have all the component weights figured out (including the rifle, scope, rings, and the bipod), you can then play around with the barrel contour and length to get close to but not over the limit.

Summary

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